Yun to promote access as engineering school's associate dean for diversity and inclusion

Aug. 27, 2018 2:29 p.m.
Julie Yun

Julie Yun

Julie Yun, an innovative leader with experience in higher education and health care, has joined the School of Engineering and Applied Science as associate dean for diversity and inclusion, effective Aug. 13.

Reporting to Dean Emily Carter in this new role for the engineering school, Yun will work to support recruitment and retention of a fully diverse engineering community across all academic ranks. For the past three years, Yun served as assistant dean for access, diversity and inclusion in Princeton’s Graduate School. During the last academic year, she worked closely with the engineering school’s leadership and with individual departments on recruitment and admissions strategies aimed at diversifying the school’s graduate student population.

“This position is critical to the future of engineering at Princeton,” said Carter, the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment. “We aim to create solutions for the world’s most pressing problems; by recruiting talent from all backgrounds at all career stages who will provide firsthand, diverse perspectives, the solutions will be all the more impactful. Julie’s extensive experience, education, personal empathy and proven track record of success are the reasons why I am truly delighted that Julie has joined my leadership team.”

From 2013 to 2015, Yun directed the counseling center at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Prior to that, she spent 12 years working in counseling and student services at the University of Colorado Boulder. In these roles, she focused on breaking down barriers to student mental health and outreach services, notably to underrepresented populations.

“The one theme that has run through my entire career is a commitment toward equity,” said Yun. “I’ve used every single position to promote access for students — to support services and to academic opportunities.”

During the past year working with the engineering school, she said, “I got a very good sense of how passionate and committed our faculty are to making sustainable changes to improve diversity and inclusion. I’m excited about working full-time with SEAS to advance some of the initiatives we started this past year, and really expand on them” to include faculty and undergraduate populations in addition to the graduate population.

Yun holds dual master’s degrees in applied psychology and family studies from Boston University and the University of Arizona, respectively, and a Psy.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Denver.